New York's Public Park, the High Line, at NYSE

Co-Founders Joshua David and Robert Hammond visited the NYSE to mark the expansion of the High Line, a public park built on an historic railroad viaduct elevated above the streets on the West Side of Manhattan. In honor of the occasion, David and Hammond rang The Opening BellSM, joined by John Alschuler, Chairman of the Board of Friends of the High Line; James Corner and Ric Scofidio, members of the High Line Design Team; Adam Levin, President of the Philip and Janice Levin Foundation; and staff members of Friends of the High Line.

The first section of the High Line opened on June 9, 2009. The second section of the High Line opened on June 7, 2011, doubling the length of the public park and connecting three neighborhoods along Manhattan’s West Side.

About Friends of the High Line

Founded in 1999 by community residents, Friends of the High Line fought for the High Line’s preservation and transformation at a time when the historic structure was under the threat of demolition. It is now the non-profit conservancy working with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation to make sure the High Line is maintained as an extraordinary public space for all New Yorkers and visitors to enjoy. In addition to overseeing maintenance, operations, and public programming for the park, Friends of the High Line works to raise the essential private funds to support more than 90 percent of the park’s annual operating budget.

About the High Line

The High Line is a public park built on an historic railroad viaduct elevated above the streets on the West Side of Manhattan. Originally built to lift dangerous freight trains off of Manhattan’s streets, the High Line delivered milk, meat, produce, and manufactured goods into the upper-floor loading docks of factories and warehouses. The last train ran on the High Line in 1980, carrying a trainload of frozen turkeys.

The first section of the High Line opened on June 9, 2009. The second section of the High Line opened on June 7, 2011, doubling the length of the public park and connecting three neighborhoods along Manhattan’s West Side.

Still overgrown with wildflowers and grasses, the third section of the High Line represents one-third of the entire historic High Line structure (about one-half mile) and it remains in private ownership. Friends of the High Line is working with the City of New York to advocate for its transformation into a public park.